Registrierung Kalender Tigerforum-Chat Häufig gestellte Fragen Suche Mitgliederliste Moderatoren und Administratoren Statistik Database Galerie TopListe Glossar Startseite
Tigerforum » Raubkatzen & Wölfe » Leoparden » Öl-Pipeline bedroht die letzten Amur-Leoparden » Hallo Gast [registrieren|anmelden]
« Vorheriges Thema Nächstes Thema » Druckvorschau | An Freund senden | Thema abonnieren | Glossareintrag vorschlagen
Antwort erstellen Neues Thema erstellen
Autor
Beitrag [  «    1  2  3  4  ]
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Es hat wohl alles nichts geholfen, die Pipeline wird gebaut:


Building has started!
Pacific pipeline update 25 March 2005

In spite of growing opposition against its route, building of the world's longest oil pipeline that will transport oil from Siberia to the coast of the Sea of Japan has started. The picture shows a noisy drilling machine that collects soil samples as part of building preparations that started along the pipeline route and at the terminal site in the Khasan district in Southwest Primorski Krai. The hills in the background are part of the Kedrovaya Pad nature reserve, home to world's remaining population of 30 Amur leopards. According to Khasan Duma deputy Andrei Yurchenko, the head of the Khasan administration, having received an approval from the Khasan Duma chairman, signed the documents approving the allotment of land for the pipeline and terminal in Khasan district. According to Yurchenko, the chairman of Khasan Duma exceeded his powers in doing so. As the issue was not discussed in Duma and did not receive endorsement of the local deputies, the allotment of land is illegal.



The Moscow Times of 17 February 2005 contains the following quote from an interview with the head of Transneft, Semyon Vainshtok: ``The project is already being implemented, since the government gave its go­ahead in December. I have 4,000 people sent down there, and they are working on the route''. It is peculiar, to say the least, that implementation has started before the project's feasibility study and building plan have been completed.
In February 2005 Primorsky Krai vice­governor Viktor Gorchakov stated in an interview with the local newspaer Zolotoy Rog that the oil terminal construction at Perevoznaya on the Amur Bay would be completed by the summer of 2006. Oil will be transported by rail to the terminal until the oil pipeline is finished. Additional infrastructure will be developed in Khasan district, including roads, railroads and oil storage capacity. Gorchakov pointed out that construction of the oil refinery was an idea of Primorski Governor Darkin. Gorchakov admits in the interview that the efforts to save the Amur leopard from extinction may have been in vain if all these infrastructure projects are implemented.
In the same interview Gorchakov accuses foreign powers to back up the opposition of the Russian environmental movement against the pipeline, because the pipelne is not in their interest. Gorchakov forgets to mention that the vast majority of the Russian environmentalists do not oppose the pipeline at all, but only the last 3% of its route and the selected terminal location on the Amur Bay.

Open letter to the Japanese government
A number of Russian and international NGOs has sent a letter to the Japanese Prime Minister and his cabinet with a request to urge Transneft and the Russian government to change the pipeline's route and terminal location. Signatory parties to the open letter include Phoenix, PERC, WWF, Greenpeace, and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

According to Russian and western media, Japan has pledged to provide 7 billion U.S. dollars in loans for the construction of the pipeline and 5 billion for the development of oil fields in central Siberia. The total investments required to build the pipeline are estimated at 11 to 17 billion U.S. dollars. It is unclear who will provide the remaining 6 to 10 billion dollars.
According to some sources, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) is interested in the project. Loans offered by the Japanese government are usually provided by the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), a 100% government­ owned bank operating with public funds. The Phoenix Fund wrote to JBIC to inquire about the status of the pipeline project and the results of the environmental and social project reviews that are required according to JBIC's environmental and social guidelines. To our surprise JBIC answered that no environmental reviews had been carried out, because it had not yet received an official request for funding of the pipeline project. JBIC and most other large public banks have strict environmental and social guidelines. JBIC's guidelines require, for instance, that the negative impact to protected areas and endangered species are minimised and that the opinion of local citizens needs to be taken into account. The local citizens strongly oppose the pipeline's planned path through Southwest Primorsky Krai and its terminal locatin in Perevoznaya Bay, which will needlessly threaten 3 protected areas as well as rare and endangered species, including the nearly extinct Amur leopard. It is clear that funding of the pipeline project would be in violation of JBIC's guidelines, unless the route and terminal location are changed. The Japanese government has put itself in a difficult situation by offering funding for a project that presently does not meet international environmental an social standards. Likewise, the Primorsky Krai administration takes big risks by investing in terminal and the previously described infrastructure projects in and around Perevoznaya on the Amur Bay, because it is unlikely that a pipeline to the Amur Bay will receive the foreign investments required for its construction.

Pipeline referendum
A committee of Khasan district citizens tried to organize a referendum about the plan to build the pipeline terminal on the Amur Bay in Khasan district. The Khasan Duma first agreed to organize a referendum, but later withdrew this decision after the prosecutor's office objected it on the grounds that a local referendum could only be held on local issues. Local people will file a lawsuit against the Khasan administration's decision not to hold a referendum. Local
people and environmentalists argue that, whereas the pipeline is a Russian national issue, the location of the terminal in Khasan district is a local issue that affects mostly Khasan citizens.
The Phoenix Fund organized a small poll in Khasan district and asked 202 citizens of 18 years and older their opinion about the issue. Only 26% of the participants were in favour of the pipeline terminal in the district. More than twice as many (56%) were against, while 18% had not formed an opinion.



Other terminal locations are being considered
The Primorski Krai administration continues to heavily promote the terminal location on the Amur Bay. Anton Semyonov of the environmental NGO ISAR in Vladivostok says that local journalists informed him that the Primorsky Krai administration would boycott journalists and newspapers that write negatively about the plan to build the terminal on the Amur Bay. The Krai has substantially increased its media budget in recent years and local media depend to a large extent on support from the Krai. In February 2005 vice governor Viktor Gorchakov met with the chief of Russia's Sea and River Transport Agency Vyacheslav Ruksha. Local media in Vladivostok quoted Ruksha saying, "Choosing Perevoznaya as the end point for the pipeline is the Russian government's decision, and there will be no further discussion or consideration of other alternatives". However, the Ministry of Transport, of which Ruksha's agency is part, was quick to rectify and state that in fact several options, including Perevoznaya on the Amur Bay, were still being considered. The Ministry added that the final decision coul still take several months. Meanwhile, the head of Transneft, Semyon Vainshtok, and the Minister of Energy and Industry, Viktor Khristenko, continue to talk about the ``Taishet­Nakhodka'' pipeline. At least Khristenko, who was born and grew up in Vladivostok, should know that Nakhodka and Perevoznaya are not the same.

Quelle: CarnivoreConversation.org/Phoenix Fund


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

Dieser Beitrag wurde von SirLeo am 04.04.2005, 11:15 Uhr editiert.

04.04.2005, 11:09
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Mhh verzeiht Doppelpost.. Aber jetzt wirds echt eng für die Amur Leos. Die russiche Regierung hat dem Bau zugestimmt, und bereits im Mai soll damit begonnen werden, und zwar mitten durchs Naturschutzgebiet (Primorye, Amur Bay).

Es ist nichtmehr lange hin, aber es wäre trotzden cool wenn sich noch jemand mir anschliessen würde, und ebenfalls wenigstens versucht das ganze doch noch zu kippen.

Hier mal ein paar Adressen:

Russische Botschaft in DE

Präsident Putin

Bürgermeister von Primorsky
Primorsky Krai Governor Sergei Darkin
22 Svetlanskaya street
Vladivostok 690110
Russia
Email (ganz unten)

Betreiber der Pipeline: Transneft
Transneft
Director Simyon Vainshtock
Bolshaya Polyanka str. 57
Moscow 119180
Russia
transneft@transneft.ru

Sponsor des Wahnsinns: The Japan Bank for International Cooperation
The Japan Bank for International Cooperation
The Governor of JBIC
4-1 Ohtemachi 1-chome
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-8144
Japan
Email

Und hier noch ein Beispielbrief

Danke denjenigen, die's wenigstens versucht haben!

peez
dacutta

EDIT: Quelle vergessen: Phoenix Fund


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

Dieser Beitrag wurde von SirLeo am 25.02.2005, 15:43 Uhr editiert.

25.02.2005, 14:31
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Also erstmal frag ich mich ja, wieso man gerade in Russland, wo es so viel Pampa gibt wie nirgendwo ne Pipeline gerade durch ein geschütztes, von der UNESCO zum Biosphärenreservat erklärtes Gebiet ziehen muss. Noch dazu, dass diese Landschaften auch sehr empfindlich sind, und sich von solchen "Bauspuren" mehrere Jahrzehnte lang nicht erholen werden.

Ich kenn mich zwar nicht wirklich aus, in der russischen Tier und Naturschutz Welt, aber ich kann mir vorstellen, dass dieses Vorhaben durchaus zu einer stillen Ausrottung führen kann (man sehe sich mal sibirische Pipelines an, und mann weiss wieso). Denn kümmern tut das dort wohl eher keinen.

Aber momentan hilft hier wohl erstmal nur Abwarten, was hier von Seite der Tierschutzorganisationen passiert, noch scheint das eher eine geschlossene Sache zu sein. Aber gerade die Tatsache dass sich der Bestand der Amur Leos wieder erholt hat, es aber immer noch eine verhältnismäsig kleine Population ist, und es hier ja auch um das mögliche Aussterben der Katzen in freier Natur geht, erwarte ich da dann doch etwas Aufmerksamkeit aus den Reihen derer die auch wirklich Gewicht haben. Alleine kann man hier mit Sicherheit nichts ausrichten.
Ich werd das auf jeden Fall im Auge behalten. Danke hierfür tigerlilly!

Achja, wen's interessiert: Die Zoological Society London sowie die Organisation AMUR befassen sich bereits mit diesem Thema.

UPDATE:
Das Thema schiebt sich wohl (wie ich es nicht erwartet hatte) schön durch alle erdenklichen Webseiten diverser Medienanbieter. Gut ist das! Des Weiteren bin ich bei meinen Recherchen immer wieder auf eine Petition gestossen, sie beschäftigt sich zwar nicht mit der Pipeline, aber mit dem Schutz der Amur Leos allgemein. Besser als nichts, bittesehr:
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/542398780


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

Dieser Beitrag wurde von SirLeo am 24.02.2005, 11:43 Uhr editiert.

27.01.2005, 14:06
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
tiger-lilly
Tiger




Dabei seit: Juni 2004
Herkunft: Kassel
Hessen (DE)
Beiträge: 1318
tiger-lilly ist offline
Themenstarter Dieses Thema wurde von tiger-lilly gestartet
  Öl-Pipeline bedroht die letzten Amur-LeopardenAntwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Ölpipeline bedroht die letzten Amurleoparden

Im vergangenen Jahr kündigte die staatseigene russische Firma Transneft an, das eine neue Ölpipeline geplant ist. Diese soll sich von Taishet in Ostsibirien bis nach Pervoznaya in der pazifischen Prinorsk-Region erstrecken. Das Problem ist, daß diese Pipeline genau durch das Gebiet der letzten 30 wildlebenden Amurleoparden führt. 10 reinrassige Amurleoparden leben noch in Gefangenschaft. Die letzte Hoffnung ist, daß die russische Regierung dem Appell nachgibt, dass die Pipeline umgeleitet wird.

Quelle: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4197737.stm

25.01.2005, 19:24
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu  
[  «    1  2  3  4  ]   « Vorheriges Thema Nächstes Thema » Standard | Brettstruktur | Baumstruktur
Antwort erstellen Neues Thema erstellen
Gehe zu:

Powered by: Burning Board 1.1.1 © 2001 WoltLab GbR
Code-, Style- und Templateanpassung © 2004 by Sesshoumaru
Seitenabrufe pro Tag im Durschschnitt: 14750.74
.: Kontakt :. | .: Impressum / Disclaimer :.