Registrierung Kalender Tigerforum-Chat Häufig gestellte Fragen Suche Mitgliederliste Moderatoren und Administratoren Statistik Database Galerie TopListe Glossar Startseite
Tigerforum » Raubkatzen & Wölfe » Leoparden » Öl-Pipeline bedroht die letzten Amur-Leoparden » Hallo Gast [registrieren|anmelden]
« Vorheriges Thema Nächstes Thema » Druckvorschau | An Freund senden | Thema abonnieren | Glossareintrag vorschlagen
Antwort erstellen Neues Thema erstellen
Autor
Beitrag [  «    1  2  3  4    »  ]
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Nicht viel neues, aber lesenswert.

Wenn das so weitergeht, liegen bald zwei Piplines mehr in Russlands Osten rum.
Das Problem ist folgendes: Es gibt dort in dieser Gegend bereits einen Terminal in Nakhodka, welche allerdings mit Zügen bedient wird, aber würde man die Pipeline dorthin bauen, hätte man "keine" Probleme mit Naturschutzgebieten, und bedrohten Tierarten. Ein weiterer soll - wie schon oft erwähnt in der Primorye (Amur Bay) entstehen. Inklusive Pipeline. Die eine Seite der hohen Tie.. der Anzugträger wollen die Pipe lieber nach Nakhodka führen, die anderen (weil dann nicht nur Öl, sondern auch Geld fließt) lieber Richtung Amur Bay. Wiederstand ist da, von der Bevölkerung, und sogar vom Umweltministerium, aber es ist allseits bekannt, dass sich mit Geld Meinungen leicht ändern lassen. Und wenn das erstmal rinnt, ist auch dieser Gedankengang voll ernst zu nehmen:

Once the terminal is operational, Japanese
financiers and Transneft could argue that the additional environmental damage from linking the existing infrastructure to the pipeline would be marginal


Soviel (mehr oder weniger..) zur Einleitung. Hier nun der wirklich aufschlussreiche Artikel aus der "Moscow Times" vom 31. 05.

-----

Tuesday, May 31, 2005. Issue 3177. Page 10.

Pumping Peril to the Pacific

By Roman Vazhenkov


With an estimated cost of $11 billion to $17 billion, the Pacific pipeline will be Russia's largest infrastructure project to date. With a total length of over 4,188 kilometers, it will be the longest oil pipeline in the world. And there is another area where the project is competing for first place: environmental damage.

In violation of Russian law and the International Convention for
Protection of the World Natural and Cultural Heritage, Transneft,
Russia's oil pipeline monopoly, is considering a route that passes by Lake Baikal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, coming within one kilometer of the lake and crossing many rivers, including the lake's largest tributary, the Angara.

Even more bizarre is the proposed terminal location at Perevoznaya on Amur Bay. Ecologists believe that it would be impossible to select a site along the Primorye region's extensive coast that would do more damage to the environment.

At a well-attended public hearing in Vladivostok last year, 20 panelists, including the directors of local nature preserves, scientists and conservationists, made five-minute presentations. While the arguments varied, their conclusion was the same: Do not build the terminal on the Amur Bay.


The proposed terminal site at Perevoznaya is right in the middle of Russia's foremost biodiversity hotspot. Thirty percent of Russia's endangered species live there, and some 50 species are found only on this small sliver of land between China and North Korea. The pipeline route and terminal would threaten several important protected areas including Russia's only marine preserve and Russia's oldest nature preserve, which is home to the only remaining population of Amur leopards. With only 30 to 40 individuals remaining in the wild, the Amur leopard is probably the world's rarest big cat.

Oil spills would potentially threaten the coast of Vladivostok, located across Amur Bay from the proposed terminal. The waters at Perevoznaya are shallow, and the terminal would have to be built approximately two kilometers offshore. Oil spills in open waters several kilometers from the coast would prove almost impossible to contain, and currents would rapidly spread oil over a wide area. Tankers sailing to and from Perevoznaya would have to navigate through a string of islands. These circumstances, combined with frequent gales and fog banks, dramatically increase the probability of disaster.

The selected terminal site is equally hard to understand from an
economic perspective. Primorye's most popular sand beaches, visited by tens of thousands of tourists annually, are located near the proposed terminal and the tanker routes. Amur Bay is also a critical economic zone for fishing. The local population relies on this industry and strongly opposes construction of an oil terminal nearby.

Better terminal sites are easy to find. The best options are near
Nakhodka, Primorye's largest port. The route to Nakhodka would not pose any threat to protected areas or endangered species, and local sea currents would be less likely to spread oil spills. The Nakhodka option would be more cost effective. Large amounts of oil destined for shipment to Japan and other countries are already transported to Nakhodka by rail. At Perevoznaya, in contrast, the proposed oil terminal, storage tanks and oil refinery would be built from scratch.

Nakhodka featured in earlier plans as a location for the terminal. Why was the Nakhodka option abandoned?

The strong lobby by Primorye Governor Sergei Darkin and his
administration probably played a major role. According to Viktor
Cherepkov, the former mayor of Vladivostok, Darkin and his business associates acquired land at Perevoznaya before promoting this spot as the terminal location. A former head of the Primorye regional branch of the Natural Resources Ministry, Alexander Savvin, told a local activist in a private conversation three years ago that Darkin had invited him to a private meeting shortly after the plan to build the Pacific pipeline to Nakhodka was made public. Savvin said that Darkin had requested his
assistance in opening lawsuits against the oil companies in Nakhodka in order to force them into bankruptcy and acquire their assets, according to the activist.

Later, Perevoznaya became the site of choice. Darkin has denied
accusations that he has a financial interest in a Perevoznaya terminal.
However, Darkin and Deputy Governor Viktor Gorchakov continue to promote the site, and Vladivostok journalists report that they have been strongly advised by local authorities not to give the site any bad press.

Financing for the project would consist of Japanese public funds from the Japan Bank for International Cooperation. The JBIC, however, abides by environmental and social guidelines that take into consideration damage to protected areas, endangered species and vulnerable ecosystems, as well as the opinion of citizens, scientists and environmentalists. The terminal at Perevoznaya would never meet JBIC's environmental criteria, and therefore the bank could not make a loan to finance the terminal. However, loans could be made to fund the rest of the pipeline project, if the terminal were to be built without international money before a loan request was made.

And this is exactly what Transneft plans to do. Transneft recently gave a presentation to the Primorye regional Duma and invited deputies on a junket to an oil terminal on the distant Baltic coast. Thus, Transneft is serious about Perevoznaya. Once the terminal is operational, Japanese financiers and Transneft could argue that the additional environmental damage from linking the existing infrastructure to the pipeline would be marginal. Russian and international nongovernmental organizations have repeatedly invited the JBIC to discuss its oil projects in Primorye. The bank has refusedthe invitation.

There is one last glimmer of hope for Amur Bay and the Amur leopard. The Natural ResourceMinistry must conduct an environmental impact assessment, or EIA, of the pipeline project. Transneft can build the terminal at Perevoznaya only if it gets the green light after an EIA. The ministry's Primorye branch has publicly stated its opposition to a terminal at Perevoznaya. It is an open secret that Deputy Minister Valentin Stepankov, who is responsible for the EIA, also favors Nakhodka. But many fear that the ministry will crack under pressure from pro-Perevoznaya forces.

The EIA will be a major test of Russia's willingness to protect its still- rich biodiversity. The Russian and the international environmental communities are following the developments with much interest, but little hope.


Roman Vazhenkov is campaign coordinator at Greenpeace Russia. He contributed this comment to The Moscow Times.


Qellle: CarnivoreConservation.org


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

02.06.2005, 11:30
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Mal zurück zum Thema Leute. Es gibt neues von der Front.

Am 12. April besichtigten Japanische Offizielle die Terminal Baustelle in Perevonznaya. Zu ihrem Erstaunen gab es aber keine Baustelle, sondern eine Gruppe von Tierschützern, welche es zuvor geschafft hatten die sog. ILLEGALEN Bauarbeiten durch die Staatsanwaltschaft von Primorsky Krai zu stoppen, und die Baumaschinen abziehen zu lassen.
Dies passte wohl einigen Leuten garnicht, so dass der Bürgermeister von Primorsky Krai jegliche Kommunikation zwischen den Protestlern und den Besuchern zu unterbinden...
Aber, es ist doch trotzdem ein grosser Erfolg, und vorallem ein grosser Schritt in die richtige Richtung.

Wenn es euch interessiert, lest die englische Mitteilung vom Phoenix Fund. Er ist einfach zu Ausfürhlich um ihn jetzt vernünftig auf Deutsch wiederzugeben.

-----

Amur Leopard and Tiger Alliance (ALTA)
Pacific Pipeline Update 24 April 2005

Major victory for conservation NGOs:
Prosecutor stops illegal building activities at proposed oil terminal site!

Japanese delegation visits proposed terminal site



On Tuesday 12 April 2005 representatives of the Primorsky Krai administration visited the proposed oil terminal site at Perevoznaya on the Amur Bay, with a delegation of Japanese investors. However, a few days before the delegation's arrival the Primorsky Krai Prosecutor's Office had acted on a complaint from the conservation NGO ISAR -- and ordered a halt to the illegal building activities at the proposed site. By the time the Japanese delegation arrived, the companies involved had packed their equipment and left. All that remained for inspection was a windy coast .... and a protest group!
The protestors included the staff of Phoenix and other conservation NGOs and of the nearby Kedrovaya Pad reserve (home to the remaining population of 30 Amur leopards), schoolchildren, and local villagers. The Japanese were astonished to see the protestors, who met the delegation with banners and flags ­ but they soon recovered and began to smile and wave and it did not take long before the first cameras appeared. However, the Krai representatives were not amused. They prevented communication between the protestors and the Japanese businessmen when the Japanese had to leave the bus for a brief moment to let nature take its course after the 3­hour drive from Vladivostok. Primorsky Krai governor Darkin made a counter visit to Japan as a member of a delegation headed by
Victor Khristenko, Russia's Minister of Industry and Energy, to discuss the pipeline project with Japanese officials and businessmen.



Bullying

The director of the Kedrovaya Pad reserve has informed Phoenix that the Khasan district and the Primorsky Krai authorities paid a visit to the local school director. The authorities demanded a letter from her explaining why she had permitted schoolchildren to participate in the protest. The Krai administration was also angry at the Khasan administration for not providing sufficient police "protection'' (the traffic police accompanying the delegation had not acted against the protestors).

Japan reluctant to start a dialogue

The Japanese delegation visiting the proposed terminal site included representatives of the public Japanese bank JBIC. Japan has pledged to provide the majority of the 11 -- 18 billion US dollars needed to build the pipeline in the form of soft loans from this bank. Two months ago, ALTA partner Phoenix asked JBIC to open a dialogue on the terminal with concerned Russian environmentalists and scientists. JBIC replied promptly that it could not discuss the project with "third parties'', until it had received an official request for funding from Transneft, the Russian state­owned oil pipeline monopolist. In this light it is peculiar that JBIC representatives travelled to Primorsky Krai to discuss the project with businessmen and the Primorsky Krai authorities -- the Krai and the businessmen are
also "third parties"! Phoenix therefore decided repeating its suggestion to start a dialogue with all stakeholders, including scientists and environmentalists. Phoenix has not yet received a reply to its message sent on 11 February, although JBIC answered previous messages within 24 hours.
The open letter to the Japanese government sent by approximately 40 Russian and international NGOs on 14 March 2005 has also not been answered yet (the text of this letter is available on the Phoenix website: www.phoenix.vl.ru).

Growing opposition from Russian officials against proposed terminal location

Yuri Osipov, the president of the Russian Academy of Sciences, appealed to Dmitry Medvedev, the chief of the presidential staff to reconsider the the decision to build the terminal on the Amur Bay.
According to Osipov, the approved route has a high degree of ecological risk and he states that "the choice of the Perevoznaya as the end point of the pipeline is very undesirable."
On March 21, the press carried a statement from the Federal Service of Ecological, Technological and Nuclear Supervision (Rostekhnadzor, responsible for Environmental Impact Assessments of large infrastructure projects), which instructed Transneft to justify the choice of Perevoznaya bay as the site
for the oil terminal. "We share the concern of public and environmental organisations over the East Siberia­Pacific pipeline and believe that at the subsequent design stages Transneft should justify its choice of Perevoznaya Bay for building a port," said Andrei Malyshev, head of the service. Director of the Presidential Administration Dmitry Medvedev sent a letter to Prime Minister Mikhail Fradkov with a request to consider building the pipeline to the port of Nakhodka instead of to the
proposed terminal location on the Amur Bay.
It is doubtful that Transneft can continue to ignore the growing opposition against the proposed pipeline route for long.

Transneft starts talking to shrimps

While the Japanese visited the proposed terminal site, the president of Transneft, Simyon Vainshtok, was on the other side of the world for the annual Russian Business Forum in London. Vainstok presented Russia's ambitious plans for expansion of its oil pipeline network at the forum. After his presentation a lady from the audience asked why Transneft persists in its plan to build the terminal of the Pacific oil pipeline on the Amur Bay in Southwest Primorye, one of Russia's foremost "biodiversity
hotspots'' and home to the world's remaining population of 30 Amur leopards. Was Transneft willing to start a dialogue with concerned environmentalists about this issue? Vainshtok answer was brief: "The response to the proposed pipeline route has been hysterical. Transneft works according to Russian law, but we are willing to start a dialogue with all stakeholders; we will talk to every leopard and shrimp in the bay''! Vainshtok's answer shows what a `serious' issue the environment is to Transneft.


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

02.05.2005, 11:46
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
SirLeo
Sir Leo von Pard




Dabei seit: Juli 2004
Herkunft: Hipsterville
Berlin (DE)
Beiträge: 249
SirLeo ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

-> Teil 2

Transneft and Russian law

Many consider the prospect of Vainshtok talking to shrimps much more realistic than Transneft operating according to the law. Several conservation NGOs have filed lawsuits against Transneft for violations of Russian laws in relation to the Pacific pipeline project, and the NGO "ISAR'' has prepared a list of the main violations for the Japanese delegation visiting Vladivostok. The list includes:
1. Transneft failed to develop, and present to the public, possible alternatives for the proposed oil terminal location on the Amur Bay.
2. Transneft failed to provide documentation about the project to NGOs and scientists for their independent Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA).
3. The allotment of land for the terminal and other oil infrastructure was not discussed in the local parliament of the district where the terminal is to be built. The chairman of the parliament considers the allotment illegal.
4. Transneft failed to present assessments of the impact of the pipeline and terminal in Southwest Primorsky Krai on the Amur leopard, on the unique marine and terrestial ecosystems, and on the aquaculture, fishery and tourism industries of this region.
According to Russian law, NGOs and scientists have the right to carry out an independent "public'' Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and the official EIA supervised by the government must incorporate the results of such independent EIAs. This probably explains why Transneft has not provided the documentation that NGOs need to carry out an EIA, as hardly any reputable scientist supports Transneft's plans to build the pipeline through the watershed of Lake Baikal and locate the
pipeline's terminal on the Amur Bay. The list of experts that would like to contribute to independent EIAs is impressive, while this is not the case for the official EIA, and as a result the conclusions of independent EIAs will be impossible to ignore.
Recently Greenpeace was not allowed to register there plan to conduct an independent EIA of the pipeline project. This refusal is unlawful. A lady in the office of the authority where Greenpeace has to register its EIAs explained, off the record, that her office had received several phonecalls from Transneft as well as visits from the local prosecutor's office. Both had "strongly advised'' not to allow Greenpeace to register an EIA.
The only "independent'' EIA was conducted by "Public Environment''. This NGO seems to do little else than producing EIAs with favourable conclusions for infrastructure projects! Public Environment is registered in the same street as Transneft and their offices are only a few blocks apart. During a meeting with Greenpeace, WWF and other NGOs, Transneft vice­president Vladimir Kalinin mistakenly spoke about "our EIA'' when he meant Public Environment's EIA. Greenpeace has this "slip of the tongue'' on tape. The results of the Public Environment EIA, and this surprised no­one, were favourable for the pipeline project.

Pacific pipeline to be built without Japanese funding?

Simyon Vainshtok had a very busy week. On 17 April he was back in Moscow to chair a press conference about yet another pipeline project: the Baltic pipeline. Vainshtok announced that Transneft had secured a 250 million US dollar loan from a syndicate of private banks led by Barclays Capital from the UK. Other participants include the German Commerz Bank, the Dutch ABN­AMRO and ING banks, along with many others. Transneft will use the loans to increase the capacity of the Baltic
pipeline. At the press conference several journalists raised questions about the Pacific pipeline, and Barclays Capital indicated that it would consider investing in this project as well. One journalist asked if Transneft would be willing to re­route the Pacific pipeline to avoid damaging the highly biodiverse environment of Southwest Primorsky Krai. Vainshtok answered her question somewhat irritably. He said that the selection of the terminal location was based on economic, social as well as
environmental considerations and that Transneft was not planning to re­route. However, if needed, he would organise a round table discussion about the topic with all the tigers of the region....
In London and at the press conference in Moscow, Vainshtok stated that Transneft would not use Japanese or Russian public funding to build the Pacific pipeline. He said that Transneft would fund the pipeline with its own capital reserves and income, and with bonds. The Japanese delegation in Vladivostok was not impressed; according to them, Vainshtok was making such statements in an attempt to make the Japanese act faster. The Japanese said that they were very interested in cooperation, but prefered not to be pressed...(source: newspaper Vladivostok, 14 April). In spite of Vainshtok's statements, public funding for the Pacific pipeline still seems necessary. Transneft's own capital reserves and income are insufficient to finance this enormous project. And the risks seem too high to make the project sufficiently attractive for private investors.
The pipeline will take many years to build and it will be very difficult to control its costs. Moreover, it is questionable whether oil production in central Siberia can be sufficiently increased to operate the pipeline efficiently once ready. At least 50 million tons of oil is needed to make transportation through the pipe cheaper than by train. The maximum capacity of the pipeline will be 80 million tons per year, while present annual oil production in central Siberia is only 30 million tons.

Final comments

Ignoring the opinions of citizens, environmentalists and scientists may have helped to speed up the Pacific pipeline project preparations in Russia so far. But these same aspects backfire on Transneft when it attempts to secure foreign public funding.
To stay attractive for western private and public investors Transneft and its projects will need to meet international standards. In its present form the Pacific pipeline project does not meet these standards.
When the Japanese public bank JBIC receives a request for funding, it starts a project review process that covers the following environmental aspects:
1. The damage and threats to: biodiversity rich areas, protected areas and endangered species
2. Whether options to substantially reduce the environmental damage and risks have been examined and considered
3. Whether the documentation needed to assess the project's social and environmental impact has been made public
4. Whether the opinions of local citizens have been taken into account
5. Whether Russian laws were complied with during the project preperations These are exactly the aspects that have led to the present lawsuits against Transneft in Russia, and strong opposition to the proposed Pacific pipeline route around the world. It is also interesting that a funding proposal to JBIC should be accompanied by all relevant project documentation. Such proposals, and all related documents, can be freely accessed by any interested party. This means that the project documentation that Transneft has been withholding so far will
become available when Transneft tries to secure public funding from Japan or other developed countries for the project. NGOs and scientists can then produce solid assessments of the environmental impact and provide their reports to the public bank. We all know that the social and environmental requirements of public banks, such as JBIC, may seem strict on paper but are not always strictly applied, especially when the economic and political stakes are high. However, public banks in democratic countries can hardly afford to turn a blind eye to the environmental damage caused by controversial projects that are major topics in the media. Eventually the negative media attention resulting from the proposed pipeline route will also diminish Transneft's attractiveness to private western banks. These banks need to consider their reputation and cannot
afford criticism as a result of loans to companies and projects that damage the environment. This is especially the case when the survival of animals popular with the conservation­minded western public, such as grey whales or Amur leopards, is at stake. Eventually Transneft will have no other option than to re­route the pipeline. The new route will need to be designed, and will require a new EIA. This will substantially increase the time and money involved in the project's preparation. It is becoming clear that Transneft would have been much better off if it had given serious consideration to the environment from the start.

Quelle: CarnivoreConversation.org/Phoenix Fund


__________________
Es sind immer nur Kleinigkeiten

Dieser Beitrag wurde von SirLeo am 02.05.2005, 13:34 Uhr editiert.

02.05.2005, 11:45
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an SirLeo senden  
Animal





Dabei seit: November 2004
Herkunft: Hamburg
Hamburg (DE)
Beiträge: 493
Animal ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Hi

waren die nicht bei den Bären... oder war das der Panther? Na ja, war auch schon länger nich mehr da!
Hab vieleicht etwas zu impulsiv geschrieben, aber galube trotzdem nicht das sich diese Geschichte so abgespielt hat... Vor allem dieser unsinnige Dialog! Und warum zum Teufel will man andere Besucher daran hindern die Katze zu beobachten???
Mein Bruder ist auch in dem Alter, und ich will die nich alle über einen Kamm scheren, doch ich weiß auch wie unglaublich verdreht manche Geschichten wieder gegeben werden. Meist werden sie so erzählt, wie sie es gern hätten das es gewesen wäre!
Aber trotzdem Sorry wenn ich nich so nett war!

MfG Sven "Animal"


__________________
Nichts ist besser als Gott! Aber ich bin immer noch besser als Nichts!

Gäste haben eine hohe Meinung von mir :

Zitat:
Animal, DU schreibst da absoluten Müll.

10.04.2005, 23:40
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an Animal senden Homepage von Animal Schicke Animal eine ICQ-Nachricht  
Goldkatze
Routinier




Dabei seit: Februar 2004
Herkunft: Land der goldenen Feliden

Beiträge: 452
Goldkatze ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

@ Animal:
Es hat jetzt vielleicht nicht allzuviel mit deinem Beitrag zu tun, aber du sagtest etwas über die Nebelparder in Frankfurt. Ich war vor einer Weile dort und ich wüsste nicht, wo die zu finden sein sollten. Die für sie vorgesehene Anlage ist noch nicht fertig und ich hab nirgendwo anders irgendwas von Nebelpardern gesehen oder gelesen. Kannst du mir da irgenwie weiterhelfen?

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Und die Sache mit den Löwen, die du ansprichst... Ich weiß nicht, wie du ihre Aussage interpretierst, aber sie schreibt wie ich das sehe nur, dass sie dort als nächstes hingegangen ist. Das verstehe ich auch, denn wenn ich überall war, geh ich zum ein oder anderen Gehege nochmal hin, will heißen, die Reihenfolge Leoparden -> Löwen wäre nicht so abwegig, wie du vielleicht denkst . Zumindest an dem Teil der Geschichte finde ich rein gar nichts unglaubwürdiges, wie ich es auch drehe und wende.

Außerdem finde ich es ehrlich gesagt ein wenig ufair, ihr gleich "ins Gesicht zu knallen", dass ihre Geschichte gar nicht stattgefunden haben kann. Du kannst von mir aus sagen, dass du nicht glaubst, dass sie das hat, aber mit solch einer Endgültigkeit zu urteilen ist in meinen Augen einfach nicht fair.
Ich kenne das *Wölfchen* ein wenig und ich habe bisher nicht den Eindruck, dass sie eine von denen ist, die sich mit erfundenen Geschichten wichtig machen will. Das tun vielleicht andere, gerade in ihrem Alter, aber alle deshalb über einen Kamm zu scheren ist nicht grade die feine Englische Art.


__________________
On the day Cc was born, 6,000 unwanted pet cats and kittens were destroyed in the USA.

10.04.2005, 22:14
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an Goldkatze senden Schicke Goldkatze eine ICQ-Nachricht  
Moccaprinz
Tiger




Dabei seit: Februar 2005
Herkunft: München

Beiträge: 547
Moccaprinz ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Zitat:
Original von jokahalanick
Hallo Wolf,

Zitat:
Du liebst sie? Sie sind recht schön, schnell, aber warum kannst du die lieben? Ist doch nur ein Leopard.Bald wird was großes gebaut, dann wird er vielleicht verschwinden!Aber erzähl niemanden das ich so mit dir rede." sagte er und sah sich um




So etwas ist in meinen Augen schon kriminell, noch dazu wo es sich bei dieser Katze um eine so gut wie Ausgestorbene Tierart handelt !!



Tschüß jokahalanick


was ist daran kriminell? -> sie werden verschwinden sagt der tierpfleger -> wohin bzw. was mit ihnen passieren wird, wissen wir nicht - muss nicht heissen, dass sie irgendwie gekillt werden oder sonstiges ... das kann ich mir eh nit vorstellen, dass ne art, die so in gefahr ist, in nem deutschen zoo schlecht behandelt wird ... naja ... was solls, in der aussage ist auf jeden fall nix kriminelles enthalten ^^ das impliziert ihr hinein ...

pace


__________________
Pakistans letzte Leoparden

10.04.2005, 01:03
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an Moccaprinz senden Homepage von Moccaprinz  
Animal





Dabei seit: November 2004
Herkunft: Hamburg
Hamburg (DE)
Beiträge: 493
Animal ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Hi

irgendwie kann ich das nicht ganz glauben... Der Tierpfleger wird kaum von sich aus sowas gesagt haben und dann noch mit so einem Verschwörungs-Ton. Jaja... dieses Gespräch hat nie stattgefunden *und die Sonnenbrille zerstört sich nach dieser Nachricht selbst!*. Das war ganz sicher kein Tierpfleger, sondern eher jemand der dich ärgern wollte!
Das die Leoparden wohl bald wegkommen, stimmt, da (ich glaube) was für die Affen gebaut wird.
Es sind übrigens zwei Leoparden. Nur sieht man die wenig, da der frankfurter Zoo einer der wenigen ist der den Tieren (wenn auch kleine) Rückzugsgehege bietet.
Irgendwie ist deine Geschichte sehr unglaubwürdig... Übrigens für 10 Jahre ein toller Schreib-Stil! Du stellst dich vor den Tiger um dem "armen" Leoparden zu helfen? (na ja, vielleicht ein flüchtigkeits-fehler) Ich glaube ja, das du die Nebelparder meinst, weil du, um zu den Löwen zu kommen einmal (lächelnd) quer durch den Park hättest rennen müssen. Na ja... Wayne

Übrigens gehört der Frankfurter Zoo zu einem der Parks die sich sehr stark für den Schutz von Großkatzen einsetzten!

MfG Sven "Animal"


__________________
Nichts ist besser als Gott! Aber ich bin immer noch besser als Nichts!

Gäste haben eine hohe Meinung von mir :

Zitat:
Animal, DU schreibst da absoluten Müll.

09.04.2005, 23:45
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an Animal senden Homepage von Animal Schicke Animal eine ICQ-Nachricht  
jokahalanick
Mitglied



Dabei seit: Oktober 2003
Herkunft: Deutschland

Beiträge: 66
jokahalanick ist offline
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Hallo Wolf,

Zitat:
Du liebst sie? Sie sind recht schön, schnell, aber warum kannst du die lieben? Ist doch nur ein Leopard.Bald wird was großes gebaut, dann wird er vielleicht verschwinden!Aber erzähl niemanden das ich so mit dir rede." sagte er und sah sich um


also, falls dieser "Tierpfleger" daß wirklich zu Dir gesagt hat, dann gibt es nur eins !!

Nicht's wie nochmal hin, am besten mit Deinen Eltern oder Bekannten, und diesen Menschen zur Rede stellen !!

So etwas ist in meinen Augen schon kriminell, noch dazu wo es sich bei dieser Katze um eine so gut wie Ausgestorbene Tierart handelt !!

So etwas darf bei uns AUF KEINEN FALL zur Gewohnheit werden !!!

Tschüß jokahalanick

09.04.2005, 23:30
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu  
armurleopardenhilfe
(Gast)




Dabei seit:
Herkunft:
Beiträge:
  Antwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

nein,so wird es nicht enden...
der wwf ist schon dran,es gibt noch hoffnung...könnte ich,würde ich nach russland fliegen und denen meine meinung sagen..

09.04.2005, 09:33
 
Wolf
Wolfswelpe



Dabei seit: März 2005
Herkunft:
Rheinland-Pfalz (DE)
Beiträge: 3
Wolf ist offline
  Amur-LeopardenAntwort mit Zitat Beitrag editieren/löschen Nach weiteren Beiträge von  suchen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden        IP Adresse Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Ich finde das ist eine Schweinerei.

Erst gestern habe ich im Frankfurter Zoo einen Amur-Leoparden gesehen, es war nur ein einziger.Ich las das Schild was neben dem Gehege stand.Gerade dann kam ein Mitarbeiter zu mir.,,Na? Magst du Leoparden?" fragte er mich.[Er ist nur lieb zu mir und fragt mich, weil ich erst 10 bin, ich könnt dem eine klatschen.] ,,Nein, ich mag sie nicht - Ich liebe sie." entgegnete ich ihm. ,,Du liebst sie? Sie sind recht schön, schnell, aber warum kannst du die lieben? Ist doch nur ein Leopard.Bald wird was großes gebaut, dann wird er vielleicht verschwinden!Aber erzähl niemanden das ich so mit dir rede." sagte er und sah sich um.,,Das Gespräch hat nie statt gefunden." Als er wegging schüttelte ich den Kopf, was war das denn für ein Idiot? ,,Warum arbeiten sie, wenn sie die Tiere net lieben?" dachte ich.Ich wär dem fast hinterher gelaufen, doch dann kam der Leopard ans Gitter.Er sah mich an, sein Blick war voller Trauer.Ich redete mit ihm, er setzte sich und wartete ruhig.,,Du armer.. Wärst gerne mit anderen zusammen oder? Aber lieber in der Freiheit.. Ich will sie dir schenken.. Aber ich kann nicht, ich bin zu jung." sagte ich zu ihm.Er sah mich an.Dann kamen andere Menschen ans Gitter. ,,Hey! Schnell fotografieren, er ist nah am Gitter!" rief son Typ.,,Mädel, geh weg, du störst!" ,,Halten sie ihren Mund, wär ich nicht da würde der Leopard nicht am Gitter sein, also verschwinden sie." sagte ich und stellte mich extra vor den Tiger.Doch der verschwand auf seinen Baum, wo das Gitter großer wurde, das man wenn man fotografiert nur das Gitter hat.Ich lächelte und ging dann zu den Löwen...

Ich dachte vieles nach.Über den komischen Mitarbeiter.. dann über den Leopard, wie er sich mir gegenüber verhielt.Viele Menschen standen jetzt an seinem Gitter.Er tut mir sehr leid.

04.04.2005, 11:23
Profil von Füge  deiner Freunde-Liste hinzu Email an Wolf senden  
[  «    1  2  3  4    »  ]   « Vorheriges Thema Nächstes Thema » Standard | Brettstruktur | Baumstruktur
Antwort erstellen Neues Thema erstellen
Gehe zu:

Powered by: Burning Board 1.1.1 © 2001 WoltLab GbR
Code-, Style- und Templateanpassung © 2004 by Sesshoumaru
Seitenabrufe pro Tag im Durschschnitt: 14750.74
.: Kontakt :. | .: Impressum / Disclaimer :.